Thursday, September 21, 2017

Throwback Thursday: Huell Howser Visits Old Pasadena

Huell Howser covered Old Pasadena in his "California's Communities" series (image taken from the City of Pasadena).

As I am going through my tree to clean up and standardize locations, I keep finding that many of my cousins, particularly on my 2nd great grandmother Mary Jane (Tibbetts) Hartley's side, lived in Pasadena in the late 1800s/early 1900s.  Beloved California booster Huell Howser visited Old Pasadena, and the video is featured on the City of Pasadena website (you can view the video there):
On January 12, 2010, Huell Howser visited Pasadena on the series California's Communities. Watch as Huell tours the streets around Old Pasadena and Paseo Colorado, where old historic buildings have been preserved and merged with new buildings to create a bustling marketplace.


© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Gone for Soldiers: George W. Abbott or Francis M. Coker (1844 - 1908), Soldier

Recently an old friend called with a question about someone in the family tree I've done for him and while I was rooting around for the answer I was reminded of one of his maternal great great grandfathers who used at least two different names, as shown on his Civil War Pension Index card.

[National Archives and Records Administration. U.S., Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000. Original data: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. T288, 546 rolls.]


Here, from the Tacoma Daily News of September 26, 1893, was what the man had to say about the situation to an obviously sympathetic reporter: his true name was George W. Abbott--he had only called himself Francis Coker to keep his wealthy relatives learn that he was serving in the army as a private.

[Date: Tuesday, September 26, 1893 Paper: Tacoma Daily News (Tacoma, Washington) Page: 1 
This entire product and/or portions thereof are copyrighted by NewsBank and/or the American Antiquarian Society. 2004.
Source: GenealogyBank.com]

The next day's newspaper informed its readers that George W. Abbot had been arrested in default of bail; however he was released two days later.

[Date: Wednesday, September 27, 1893   Paper: Tacoma Daily News (Tacoma, Washington)   Page: 3  This entire service and/or content portions thereof are copyrighted by NewsBank and/or its content providers.
Source: GenealogyBank.com]

[Date: Friday, September 29, 1893   Paper: Tacoma Daily News (Tacoma, Washington)   Page: 3  
This entire service and/or content portions thereof are copyrighted by NewsBank and/or its content providers.
Source: GenealogyBank.com]


Had he actually earned a pension? As a soldier, there isn't much in the way of records--an 1872 enlistment record for a 25-year-old Francis M. Coker (born in Missouri) who deserted six months after he joined.


[Ancestry.com. U.S. Army, Register of Enlistments, 1798-1914 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007. Original data: Register of Enlistments in the U.S. Army, 1798-1914; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M233, 81 rolls); Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1780’s-1917, Record Group 94; National Archives, Washington, D.C.]


["United States Index to General Correspondence of the Pension Office, 1889-1904," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-13030-34759-79?cc=1834308 : accessed 5 January 2016), Cod-Cold > image 1379 of 1853; citing NARA microfilm publication M686 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).]

I haven't been able to figure out what the outcome of Mr. Abbott's disagreement with the United States government over that pension but that's not the end of this story because Mr. Abbott continued to use his Coker identity in an 1897 Tacoma city directory, the 1900 U.S. Census and his obituary. In fact, according to cemetery records he was buried as Francis M. Coker.

[Title : Tacoma, Washington, City Directory, 1897. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. Original data: Original sources vary according to directory. ]


[Year: 1900; Census Place: Tacoma Ward 6, Pierce, Washington; Roll: 1749; Page: 16A; Enumeration District: 0187; FHL microfilm: 1241749. Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.
Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.]


[Date: Wednesday, October 14, 1908   Paper: Tacoma Daily News (Tacoma, Washington)   Page: 3.  
This entire service and/or content portions thereof are copyrighted by NewsBank and/or its content providers.
Source: GenealogyBank.com]


And since I haven't been able to locate any records for a likely George W. Abbott before the 1880 U.S. Census when he, his wife and their baby daughter were living in St. Louis, Missouri, it wouldn't surprise me if his true name wasn't either of the names we know he used.







© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Happy Birthday to Me!

I was born at this groovy place 46 years ago today.
For a long time I thought I had been born at Mercy Hospital in San Diego, but Mom told me it was at UCSD in Hillcrest.  Apparently they offered this certificate of birth, along with a picture of the building.



© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Monday, September 18, 2017

Monday Is for Mothers: Bernice Grenfell Currey - Encanto, Late 1930's

Here's another picture of the cute little calf from yesterday's post.

[From my personal collection]


Note that the light-colored bungalow in the background is the house bought by Grace Thomas Grenfell Stanton around 1920 which had been left to Mother when her grandmother died in 1935.



© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Sunday, September 17, 2017

Sunday Drive: Another Truck, Another Cow?

I've already shared some snapshots of the barn the Curreys built on their property in Encanto during the late 1930s together with pictures of their cow and wheat field but I didn't include this picture. So it seemed a good choice for today's post.*

[From my personal collection]


At first what was happening appeared to be obvious--the Curreys were moving a cow in their truck, of course. But the more I examined the image, the less that seemed likely because as you can see from this photo the Currey cow wasn't black and white.

[From my personal collection]


So what was going on? The animal in the truck was a bull brought in to "visit" the cow and this later picture provides the proof.

[From my personal collection]




*Following on from this post.



© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, September 16, 2017

DNA Doesn't Solve Everything

Murder victims Claire Hough and Barbara Nantais, both found in Torrey Pines.
One of my other interests is following forensic crime investigations (sometimes they aren't that different than genealogy research).

DNA has finally revealed the murderer of these two San Diego girls, both murdered at Torrey Pines beach in the late 1970s/early 1980s--or has it?  Although I have always lived in San Diego I had never even heard of this case before today!

"48 Hours" ran this video "Blood in the Sand" on May 2, 2016 (run time 43:26, there are ads).


© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Friday, September 15, 2017

Limited Time Free Webinar: Nicka Smith presents "Finding Isaac Rogers"


I've been waiting a while for this one!  The list of situations and events listed for this webinar touch on almost every genealogical interest I've heard of from Americans with some Southern ancestry.  Nick Smith presented "Finding Isaac Rogers" on September 13, 2017 (free to non-subscribers through September 20, 2017):
Discover how a book, scant clues, crowd sourced research, and limited online records came together to make ancestral ties to the Trail of Tears, US Civil War, a hanging judge, an outlaw, and of slavery in the Cherokee Nation.

Runs 1 hour 32 minutes



© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.