Sunday, August 20, 2017

Sunday Drive: Doheny State Park - 1948

The caption of this color slide reads: "1948 Doheny SP on way home"

[From my personal collection]


As usual Dad had me posed facing into the sun so my eyes are closed as usual. I'm not sure if I was waving or trying to shield my face from the sunlight.




© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, August 19, 2017

Back to School, circa 1980

Me, from my personal collection.  I'm not sure when this was taken, but possibly for my 4th grade year?
It's that time again, when the kids are all going back to school.  I don't remember what year this was.  I was inclined to say 3rd grade (1979) but it might be 4th grade (1980).

Sears had some girls clothes that are similar in theme in their Fall 1980 catalog.  I don't think my outfit was from Sears, but might have either been purchased for me by my grandmother, or my mom may have made it.  I don't remember if it was a dress or a pant suit:

"Budget Basics: Little Girls' Dresses," Sears catalog (Catalog Number : 261H), Fall 1980, page 15; digital image, Historic Catalogs of Sears, Roebuck and Co., 1896-1993, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : 19 Aug 2017).



"A Bevy of Beautiful Dresses," Sears catalog (Catalog Number : 261H), Fall 1980, page 16; digital image, Historic Catalogs of Sears, Roebuck and Co., 1896-1993, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : 19 Aug 2017).




© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Friday, August 18, 2017

From the Probate Files: Susanah* Mrs. Johnson - Chowan County, North Carolina, 1718

We know almost nothing about this paternal eighth great grandmother** but when she made her will on August 13, 1717, she was living in Chowan Precinct in Albermarle County, North Carolina, and had survived her husband William by five years.

[A new & accurate map of the provinces of North & South Carolina, Georgia &c. Drawn from the late surveys and regulated by astronl. observatns. By Eman. Bowen. (London: Printed for William Innys, Richard Ware, Aaron Ward, J. and P. Knapton, John Clarke, T. Longman and T. Shewell, Thomas Osborne, Henry Whitridge ... M.DCC.XLVII). David Rumsey Historical Map Collection]

[Detail of above map showing the location of Chowan]

The first information we found about Susanah's will was through an abstract, but fortunately the North Carolina State Archives has an image of her will which I have transcribed below.

[Abstract of North Carolina Wills [1663-1760] [database on-line]. Ancestry.com]

[Johnson, Susanah, 1718. Office of Secretary of State: Call Number: SS 839 - SS 861
MARS Id: 12.96.13.48 (Folder). North Carolina State Archives]

In the name of God Amen
I Susanah Johnson of the precinct of Chowan In the Collony
of North Carolina Semtress: Being Infirm in body: Butt of
a perfect health of Mind and memory: Prayse be therefore given
to Almighty God - - - -
I do make and ordaine This my last Will and Testament, In
manor and form as followeth - - - -
First I commend my soule Into the hands of Almighty God -
hoping through the merritts and death and passion of my Saviour
Jesus Christ to have full and free pardon and forgiveness of all my
Sins: And to Inherit Everlasting life - - - -
And my body I committ to the Earth to be decently Interred
At the Descretion of my Executrix hereafter named - - - -
And as touching the Dispossall of all Such Temperiall Estates as
itt hath pleased Almightly God to bestow upon me I give and dispose
As followeth - - - -
First I will all my Just debts And funeral Charges be paid and disch-
arged -
Item   I give unto my son William Johnson one Shilling
Item   I give and bequeath unto my grandson Jacob parrott one two year
          heifer - - - -
Item   I give and bequeath unto my granddaughter Susanah parrott*** one two year
          old heifer and one small deale box
Item   I give and bequeath unto my granddaughter Elizabeth Parrott one two year
          old heifer and one popalar box
Item   I give and bequeath unto my beloved friend Mr John Hardy one gold
          ring of Twenty Shillings Value
Item   I give unto my godson Edward Frederick Rasor one two year old heifer
Item   I give and bequeath unto my Daughter Frances Rasor all this my
          my plantation where I now dwell containing Six hundred and forty acers
          unto her the said Frances Rasor And her disposall for Ever
Item   I give and bequeath unto my said daughter frances Rasor all my other
          Potales[?] both personall and reall
Item   I give and bequeath unto my son William Johnson one hundred acers of land
          upon the upper line of my said tract and plantation And two cows & calves
          and two sows and piggs and one deale chest This last Legacy to my son William
          is wholly depending In consideration of the said William coming with his
          wife and children and settling upon the said one hundred acers of land within one
          year after the proving this will, otherwise this Legacy is no ways Intended or given
Lastly  I appoint my beloved daughter Frances Rasor sole Executrix of this my last
             will and testament Utterly Revoking and disanolling all wills heretofore
             by me made. In witness hereof I have hereunto my hand and fixed ring
             seale this 13 of August Anno:Dom 1717
                                         Susanah Johnson
Signed and Sealed
In presence of -
Laurence Sarson
E_____ Z_____ Can?
Patrick Canadas
William Waters

It's clear than daughter Frances is Susanah's favorite; I wonder if William moved his family so he could claim his legacy?

Note: Deal is another name for pine wood; poplar is another kind of wood.

*Although some sources claim that her maiden name is Monteigne, I don't know where that comes from.
**The content of this post is "recycled" from one I wrote on October 15, 2015.
***Granddaughter Elizabeth Parrott, who was about 15 when Susanah died, married Lemuel "Lamb" Hardy, the grandson of "my beloved friend John Hardy" and their great great granddaughter Martha Heath Hardy married my great great grandfather Jesse Thomas Simeon Warren in Macon County, Alabama in 1849.

[Ancestry.com]


© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Cousin Jonathan Edward Tibbetts Spent Some Time in a Montana prison for Forgery

Jonathan E Tibbetts shares his paternal grandparents with me (my 5th great grandparents Benjamin Tibbetts and Hannah Snow) through Jonathan Snow Tibbetts (brother of my 4th great grandfather George Tibbetts, not shown).

My 1st cousin 5xs removed Jonathan Tibbetts (1856-1930) was quite difficult to track after he was last found as a clerk in Portand, Oregon in 1887.



Montana State Historical Society (Helena, MT), Prisoner Descriptions: Edward Tibbetts, 30 Apr 1910; digital image, Montana, Prison Records, 1861-1968 (http://www.ancestry.com : 17 Aug 2017).

Apparently he was quite busy (on the description above he was both a Civil Engineer and a Barber), and he also eventually ended up convicted for forgery in Great Falls, Cascade, Montana, and sentenced on April 28, 1910:
"...Held on a charge of forgery, Edward Tibbetts was arraigned before Judge Leslie yesterday afternoon, and entered a plea of not guilty.  He will be tried at the next term of the district court.  Tibbetts is alleged to have passed a bogus check for $40 on George Cor, a local saloon keeper on March 18, 1910.  The check was drawn on the First National bank and was signed "J. E. Hammond, secretary." When the check was presented for payment the bank turned it down and the matter was reported to the police.  Tibbetts was arrested on March 23, on Central avenue, by Chief of Police Pontet.
Pending his trial, Tibbetts is langusihing in the Cascade county jail."***
Definitely him--he has two sisters, Mrs. A. J. Knot and Elizabeth Hamblin (his older sisters Mary Eliza Tibbetts and Elizabeth Jane Tibbetts) in East Portland, which is where they lived.  I prefer more formal portraits, but any time I can catch a glimpse of an ancestor or kin I'll take it.  Montana State Historical Society (Helena, MT), Prisoner Descriptions: Edward Tibbetts, 30 Apr 1910; digital image, Montana, Prison Records, 1861-1968 (http://www.ancestry.com : 17 Aug 2017).

I find it interesting that he was using a name, "J. E. Hammond" which I will use to look up more records for him. After 1910 he was mentioned in a sister's will in 1915 as living in Los Angeles, and he died in Riverside County, California, in 1930, and I can't find any other records of him during that time.


The Montana State Prison was designed by the architectural firm Link and Haire in the Romanesque style, and was built in Deer  Lodge, Montana in 1871.  From "A view of Tower 7 with Cellblock in the background of the Old Montana Prison," by Wikipedia user Tanankyo.

***"Alleged Burglar and Check Forger Are Arraigned Before Judge Leslie," Great Falls Tribune (Great Falls, MT), Saturday, 16 Apr 1910, p. 5, col 1; digital image, Newspapers.com (http://www.newspapers.com : 17 Aug 2017).



© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Limited Time Free Webinar: LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson presents "Analyzing Probate Records of Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors"



My mom has done a lot of work on Mary Warren and her former owner, our 4th/5th grand uncle Jeremiah Warren, and his legal efforts to ensure she and a few of his other slaves had some protection and provision following his death.  This case came from the perspective of the slaveholder's side.  But what if you are researching in the other direction, such as tracing an enslaved ancestor's origins and background?

If you are willing to take the time to research and transcribe wills, estates, and other probate records you might be surprised at what you can unearth.

LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson shows how to begin this daunting process in "Analyzing Probate Records of Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors":
This webinar will provide an overview of the probate process, the genealogical information that can be found in a slaveholding estate, and related records that a probate proceeding may point to.

Runs 1 hour 23 minutes.  Free for non-subscribers through August 22, 2017.

© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Book Shelf: "On Writing Well" by William Zinsser

My library copy of "On Writing Well" by William Zinsser.  I'm sure it's available at most public libraries, and is available at Amazon and other online bookstores.

Blaine Bettinger ("The Genetic Genealogist") recently mentioned that Tom Jones recommended "On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction."  That is all the endorsement I need!  I am not happy with my current writing skill level so I hope reading this will help improve my blog postings.



© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Monday, August 14, 2017

Fantastic Find: Maps from "Territorial evolution of the United States" Wikipedia article by user:Golbez

I had ancestors in Indiana and the surrounding areas at this time.  "Map of the change to the United States in central North America on December 11, 1816," By Golbez - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=44551106


When I was viewing Amie Bowser Tennant's recent webinar, "Secrets and Clues Hidden in the 1790-1840 U.S. Censuses" (only available to suscribers of Legacy Family Tree Webinars), I was interested in the great maps she included of what states were part of the census at any given time.  Thankfully Tennant provided a citation to the sources, and one I didn't recognize was from a user at Wikicommons with the username Golbez.  On further inspection I see that he has provided an huge number of customized maps in the history of the expansion of the United States in a Wikipedia article "Territorial evolution of the United States".

This is a nice set of maps pertaining to the territorial evolution of the United States.  If you have any amount of American history in your genealogy you might appreciate the visualizations.



© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Sunday, August 13, 2017

Sunday Drive: "We Drivers" 1936

In 1934 the first driver's education classes were taught in American schools. This film was originally distributed by the General Motors Film Library and includes cartoon segments by by Max Fleischer (of Popeye and Betty Boop fame).



I found it on YouTube--there's a guy named Jeff Quitney has been adding documentary and training videos to his site since 2009.


© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, August 12, 2017

Some Notes on Samuel Patterson in Pleasant Township, Fairfield County, Ohio in the 1820 Census

Easter Rittcher (Esther Patterson Rittgers), born about 1803 in Maryland.  She and her husband had moved the family to Hocking County, which neighbors Fairfield. 1850 U.S. census, Hocking County, Ohio, population schedule, Marion township, p. 428 (stamped), dwelling 213, family 219, Jacob Rittcher; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 12 Aug 2017); citing NARA microfilm publication M432, roll 695.  


My 3rd great grandmother, Easter or Esther Patterson (1802-1856) married Jacob "Jake" Rittgers (1800-1879) in Fairfield County, Ohio on December 16, 1822.  Their daughter Esther (Rittgers) Nosler (1844-1887) was my great grandmother Minnie Nosler's mother.

The Rittgers have a ton of descendants, including the children of this couple, and large amount of work from others, notably Joyce Rorabaugh in "Those Roving Rittgers" but I have yet to figure out anything definite about Esther Patterson's parents and origins.  In her one named appearance on the census she was listed as born in Maryland.

Her various children listed her as from Ohio, Virginia, Scotland, or Ireland, but never Maryland.  I suspect from this that her parents likely came from the British Isles in the late 1700's (maybe earlier).

One clue I have pursued to a limited degree is the presence of a Samuel Patterson in Pleasant Township, Fairfield, Ohio in the 1820 Census.

Samuel Patterson in the 1820 Census in Pleasant Township, Fairfield, Ohio. 1820 U.S. census, Fairfield County, Ohio, population schedule, Pleasant Township, p. 90 (stamped), Samuel Patterson; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 12 August 2017); citing National Archives microfilm publication M33, roll 87


He is gone by the 1830 Census, and Jacob Rittgers (and presumably Esther Patterson) are living in the same township.


A little hard to read, but it is Jacob Rittgert or Rittgers.  Note there are different neighbors than Samuel Patterson had, but it is in the same township.  1830 U.S. census, Fairfield County, Ohio, Pleasant Township, p. 249 (stamped), line 5, Jacob Rittgers; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 12 Aug 2017); citing National Archives microfilm publication M19, roll 130.  


What happened to Samuel Patterson, and where did he go?  And who the heck was he?

Inspired by the National Genealogical Society (NGS) Magazine, July-September 2015 (Volume 41, No 3, pp 50-56) article, "Which way did the census taker walk or ride his horse?" I have begun correlating the names on the 1820 Census with the BLM data as presented in HistoryGeo, and have narrowed down where Samuel Patterson likely was.

I first tried to get a list of transcribed names from Ancestry, restricting the search to people in "Pleasant, Fairfield, Ohio" in the 1820 Census, but there was no elegant way to print the results.  Fortunately they aren't the only game in town:

Thanks to the Ohio Genealogical Society, Fairfield Chapter, the 1820 Federal Census for Pleasant Township, Fairfield County, Ohio has been transcribed (and some blessed soul even numbered them).  Ignore my scribbles.


Using the numbers in the name transcriptions, I tried to figure out where Samuel Patterson's neighbors were (so perhaps where he was) in 1820.  I used the HistoryGeo site, although you could also use BLM if you don't have a subscription.  From the list and the map I would guesstimate that Samuel was somewhere in the axis of 985/982/994, possibly bordered by the modern roads of Lancaster Thornville Rd NE, Rainbow Dr NE, and Mud House Rd NE.







I need to do the same thing with the 1830 Census to determine if Jacob Rittgers was living near where his (possible) father-in-law was, or maybe it was a different part of the township.


© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Friday, August 11, 2017

Animal Encounters: Navajo Lamb, 1953

As I've shared in several previous posts*, in 1953 we drove up into the highlands of the Navajo Nation in New Mexico. Here's a picture of me in the corral of one of the hogans we visited hugging a very cute lamb.

[From my personal collection]



*The first photo in this post shows Mother and me with the Navajo family whose relatives we were visiting and this weaver is the man's sister.


© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Free Limited Time Webinar: Judy Russell presents "A Taxing Matter: Using Tax Lists in Genealogy"



I've been waiting for this one!  I use tax lists a lot, but I doubt that I am fully utilizing all that they can reveal.

Yesterday Judy G. Russell presented "A Taxing Matter: Using Tax Lists in Genealogy" (available free to non-subscribers only through August 16, 2017):
Tax lists of all kinds, whether head taxes or taxes on real estate or personal property, are a rich source of data on families and individuals often recorded nowhere else.

Runs 1 hour 32 minutes.



© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Working on Wednesday: George Marion Tomlinson (1839 - 1922) Farmer

We're fortunate to have several pictures of this maternal great great grandfather although none of him as a young man so we don't know when he began to sport the short beard we see in all the photos.*

[Courtesy of Olive Slater-Kennedy]


The first record we've found for George Tomlinson is in the 1850 U.S. Census when he was 11, still living with his parents Jesse and Catharine (Gaskill) Tomlinson in Madison County, Ohio.

["United States Census, 1850," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-6QL2-JB?cc=1401638&wc=95RW-JW1%3A1031310001%2C1031549001%2C1031403901 : 9 April 2016), Ohio > Madison > Union > image 31 of 40; citing NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).]


The Tomlinson's moved to Washington County, Iowa, in about 1856 and four years later we find George and his 13-year=old brother Albert living with their widowed mother.**  Catharine's occupation is the only one listed, that of Farmer but we can be sure that 21-year-old George was doing his share of the work.

["United States Census, 1860," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9B9V-SXF?cc=1473181&wc=7QXT-G4G%3A1589426666%2C1589422318%2C1589428167 : 24 March 2017), Iowa > Washington > English River Township > image 12 of 34; from "1860 U.S. Federal Census - Population," database, Fold3.com (http://www.fold3.com : n.d.); citing NARA microfilm publication M653 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).]


On Christmas Eve of the same year, George married Elizabeth "Betsy" Taylor and their daughter Rufina was born January 3, 1863. When George registered for the Civil War draft six months later*** he was listed as "married" which marks the last time we can assume that Betsy was still alive. Thereafter she disappears completely from the records.

[Ancestry.com. U.S., Civil War Draft Registrations Records, 1863-1865 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Original data: Consolidated Lists of Civil War Draft Registrations, 1863-1865. NM-65, entry 172, 620 volumes. NAI: 4213514. Records of the Provost Marshal General’s Bureau (Civil War), Record Group 110. National Archives at Washington D.C.]


Three years later on March 27, 1866, George married Amanda Darling (who happened to be the sister of one of my great great grandmothers Mercy Ann Darling Webb Walsh) in Jones County, Iowa.

In the 1870 U.S. Census record dated as of June 6th, George and his family were living in Greenwood County, Kansas, and had moved there sometime after the September 1869 birth of Albert, the youngest child listed.

[Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: 1870 U.S. census, population schedules. NARA microfilm publication M593, 1,761 rolls. Washington, D.C.]


By 1880 the Tomlinson household had grown, including several of George's extended family.

[1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Original data: Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29.
National Archives, Washington, D.C.]


Although we don't know exactly when George and Amanda left Kansas for Colorado, this 1893 list of electors who hadn't voted in the recent general election.

[Boulder Daily Camera (Boulder, Boulder County) Monday, December 11, 1893
Page: 3 http://www.coloradohistoricnewspapers.org/]

By 1900 only their daughter May and grandson William (Albert's son) were living with George and Amanda on their farm in Boulder County.

[1900 United States Federal Census. Ancestry.com - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.Original data - United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.:
National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 18]


Mabel (who didn't marry until 1915) was the only other person living with her parents at the time of the 1910 U.S. Census. They're living on a country road in Boulder County.

[1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census,
Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.]

Finally, in the 1920 U.S. Census, George no longer gives his occupation as a farmer; my 80-year-old great great grandfather and his wife are listed as have "none" in that column.

Amanda died in April of the following year and by that November George's health had declined so he entered the Boulder Sanitarium where he died on August 30, 1922.

[Longmont Ledger, September 8, 1922 .Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection]

George and Amanda are buried in the Niwot Cemetery.


*Here's a group portrait taken at the same time as the the one I extracted George's image from in this post; here's the golden wedding anniversary celebration of  he and his second wife in 1916; and here's a 1918 snapshot of he and his clan returning home from camping.
**Jesse died in 1857.
***The occupation of every man on the page was listed as Farmer.
© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Legacy Quick Tip: "Creating a custom report, hashtags, DNA and more"



I've mentioned before that I am cleaning up my database, and have posted numerous times about said cleaning.

Well, the cleaning continues apace. For inspirations and to see what is waiting for me at end of the tunnel is another quick tip video by Geoff Rasmussen, "Creating a custom report, hashtags, DNA and more."  It is free to non-subscribers of the webinars.

Originally aired August 2, 2017. Runs about 21 minutes.


© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Monday, August 7, 2017

Monday Is for Mothers: Delilah "Delia" Grove (1845 - 1925) Iowa Census Records, Ancestry vs. FamilySearch

When I looked at what I had written about this maternal great great grandmother in 2014 I found that I hadn't included entries for her (and her husband Richard Worden) from various Iowa State Census records.

While that omission may have because I didn't think it important to add those records for a couple who remained in the same location (Jones County) from their arrival there by the 1850 U.S. Census until their deaths* it also could have been, at least in the case of the 1915 state census, because of the poor quality of the image provided by Ancestry.

[Ancestry.com. Iowa, State Census Collection, 1836-1925 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2007. Original data: Microfilm of Iowa State Censuses, 1856, 1885, 1895, 1905, 1915, 1925 as well various special censuses from 1836-1897 obtained from the State Historical Society of Iowa via Heritage Quest.]


I had forgotten that when a record appears in two separate websites, it's useful to check both databases because what I found at FamilySearch is obviously the from the same source but is much easier to read.

["Iowa State Census, 1915," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-8926-ZVY9?cc=2240483&wc=QSZP-HZ9%3A1291580202%2C1291585001 : 5 October 2016), Jones > Tasker, Mrs. Minnie-Zumbrunnen, Peter > image 1958 of 2374; Iowa State Historical Department, Des Moines.]


Inspired by that I decided to look at another Iowa census, this time for 1905 to see if there was a difference. What showed up via Ancestry was an index of the enumeration but not the individual cards for both of them.

[Ancestry.com. Iowa, State Census Collection, 1836-1925 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2007. Original data: Microfilm of Iowa State Censuses, 1856, 1885, 1895, 1905, 1915, 1925 as well various special censuses from 1836-1897 obtained from the State Historical Society of Iowa via Heritage Quest.]


The records on FamilySearch have been indexed and I located Delliah's card (#585) but a search for Richard Worden (#584) produced nothing. The cards in this file are not in numerical or alphabetical order (either by surname or township) so there's no clue to where his is.

["Iowa State Census, 1905," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9ZV-BWXH?cc=2126961&wc=QDRZ-TC3%3A1589972866 : 23 August 2016), 007486409 > image 3127 of 3956; State Historical Department, Des Moines.]


Although her given name is spelled Delliah in both these censuses, that's not the way it was recorded in other records. I honestly don't know which spelling she preferred.

Here's how she's related to me.

[Ancestry.com]




*1912 for Richard and 1925 for Delilah.



© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Sunday, August 6, 2017

Sunday Drive: Rolls Royce Bus - Orient Express Exhibition, 2014

Last month I shared some of the photos I'd taken during our 2014 visit to the Orient Express exhibition at the Institut du Monde Arabe in Paris. But the railroad carriages were only part of the items on display--one of the lower floors of the Institute's main building was filled with posters*, maps, tableware and china (commissioned from all the finest makers), and re-creations of various train compartments over the years, while all the movies ever filmed on the Orient Express were projected on the walls surrounding the exhibits. It was clear that no expense was spared to provide their passengers with the most luxurious forms of travel possible. For example, for those who wished to visit places beyond the train's final destination, buses like this one were provided.

[Rolls Royce bus in Lebanon, c. 1935 | Anonymous (SNCF Archives). Arlberg Orient Express]


*This link will take you to a website where you can examine 10 gorgeous Orient Express posters and related materials.




© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, August 5, 2017

Tip: Use the Terrain View on Google Maps


My great grandparents George Hartley and Minnie Nosler lived near Riverton, Coos, Oregon in the 1910 Census.  Looking up the location in Google Maps in Map View gives this image.  Notice there is a muted topographical aspect.


Switching to the Google Map Satellite View gives a better idea of the area, particularly giving some additional form to the river snaking around the higher ground.



The Terrain View in Google Maps (note: for some reason I can't switch directly from Satellite View to Terrain View, I have to switch back to Map View and THEN Terrain View).

I already knew that Google Earth had a terrain view, but I use Google Maps more often and had overlooked the Terrain View (as opposed to Map View or Satellite View, which are readily available as options when you first search in Google Maps).

The default is the Map View, and the Satellive View option is readily available at the lower left side of the map.


This is a very handy and quick way to check out the terrain for most places in the United States, particularly in rural areas not flooded for dam purposes.  Most rural areas have retained their form that they had when first settled.



To get to the Terrain View, you go the left pane with the left-pointing doubble arrows, and Terrain View (as well as other options) becomes visible.




© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Friday, August 4, 2017

From the Probate Files: Peter Worden II - New Plymouth, New England, 1680 (Part III)

When the elder Peter Worden left everything including "all my lands Leases tenaments with goods movable and unmovable in ye Towne of Clayton in ye County of Lankester" to his only son Peter Worden II (who accompanied his father to Massachusetts in about 1638) both men would have known what that property was and had some idea of its worth. 

However by 1680 no one seems to have been able to judge what value to put on the property described as "all my estate in old England both land and other estate that came by my wife*" in the Peter II's will

["Massachusetts, Plymouth County, Probate Records, 1633-1967," images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-997D-V3D1?cc=2018320&wc=M6BX-F29%3A338083801 : 20 May 2014), Wills 1633-1686 vol 1-4 > image 516 of 616; State Archives, Boston.]

Item an Interest in house and land and mony in old England
not knowing what it may be worth                                              xxx--00---0
Item an house and land both upland and meddows
in the Towne of Yarmouth                                                            500--00--0


Peter II's oldest son Samuel Worden was the main beneficiary of his father's will and he and his mother Mary acted as executors of his estate, giving their oath that the inventory** was true.

["Massachusetts, Plymouth County, Probate Records, 1633-1967," images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-997D-V3D1?cc=2018320&wc=M6BX-F29%3A338083801 : 20 May 2014), Wills 1633-1686 vol 1-4 > image 516 of 616; State Archives, Boston.]

This  2i of March 1680
Samuell Worden and Mary Worden the Relict of the
said Peter Worden maid oath to the truth of this inventory
Before mee John Freeman Assistant?;                   John Miller
                                                                               John Hall Junior:
                                                                               Paul Sears: ????


*Although there are claims made that Peter II's wife Mary's maiden name was Winslow or Seares, I'm not comfortable with either name. In any case, we don't know what property in England she had brought to the marriage.
**I will cover the complete inventory of Peter II in a later post.


© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Thursday, August 3, 2017

Don't Forget to Sign Up for the San Diego 2017 International Genetic Genealogy Conference (Dec 9-10, 2017)



The Institute for Genetic Genealogy (i4gg) and the DNA Detectives are bringing experts in the latest methodologies to San Diego, December 9 and 10, 2017.  I went last year and learned a lot.  A bonus for getting the two days was access to videos of the lectures given last year, very helpful for repeated viewing.

I already signed up early last month.  Since it is just down the road from me I won't have to book a room, but if you are from out of town you can get a room at the Sheraton Mission Valley.

Promotional info, pricing, and other information is available here.  I'm looking forward to it!


© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Working on Wednesday: David Darling (1805- 1895) Farmer

Although this maternal 3X great grandfather was born in Rhode Island, in 1816 his father (also named David*) had relocated the family to central New York State, first living in Chenango County and then moving on to Virgil in Cortland County by 1825. Although we don't have a record of their union, that's probably where the younger David and Polly Gates were married about 1830.

[Map of the counties of Chenango and Cortland, New York : from actual surveys. Philadelphia : Published by A. Pomeroy & S.W. Treat, 1863. Philadelphia : F. Bourquin & Co., Printr., 1863. Source: Library of Congress]
[Map of the counties of Chenango and Cortland, New York : from actual surveys. Philadelphia : Published by A. Pomeroy & S.W. Treat, 1863. Philadelphia : F. Bourquin & Co., Printr., 1863. Source: Library of Congress]


As far as we can tell David and his growing family remained in Cortland County through the 1850 U.S. Census which found them living in Harford, about 7-1/2 miles from Virgil. (My direct ancestor Mercy is enumerated on line 19 and her younger sister Amanda, the second wife of my great great grandfather George Tomlinson, is on line 22.)

["United States Census, 1850," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-DHWR-CB?cc=1401638&wc=95RZ-K66%3A1031313801%2C1033674601%2C1033701601 : 9 April 2016), New York > Cortland > Harford > image 11 of 24; citing NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).]


However, from the 1852 Iowa State Census we learn that the Darlings were now residing in Fairview Township in Jones County.


[Ancestry.com. Iowa, State Census Collection, 1836-1925 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007. Original data: Microfilm of Iowa State Censuses, 1856, 1885, 1895, 1905, 1915, 1925 as well various special censuses from 1836-1897 obtained from the State Historical Society of Iowa via Heritage Quest.]

David, as head of household, appeared in an 1854 Iowa State Census and the whole family are listed in the 1856 state enumeration.

[Ancestry.com. Iowa, State Census Collection, 1836-1925 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007. Original data: Microfilm of Iowa State Censuses, 1856, 1885, 1895, 1905, 1915, 1925 as well various special censuses from 1836-1897 obtained from the State Historical Society of Iowa via Heritage Quest.]


Four years later only Amanda was left at home in Fairview with David and Polly.

[Year: 1860; Census Place: Fairview, Jones, Iowa; Roll: M653_328; Page: 593; Image: 585; Family History Library Film: 803328. Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: 1860 U.S. census, population schedule. NARA microfilm publication M653, 1,438 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. ]


In Fairview 10 years later David and Polly had been joined by their widowed daughter Lovina and her son George.

[Year: 1870; Census Place: Fairview, Jones, Iowa; Roll: M593_401; Page: 67A; Image: 137; Family History Library Film: 545900. Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: 1870 U.S. census, population schedules. NARA microfilm publication M593, 1,761 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.Minnesota census schedules for 1870. NARA microfilm publication T132, 13 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.]

David and Polly were alone in their house in Fairview in the 1880 U.S. Census.

[Year: 1880; Census Place: Fairview, Jones, Iowa; Roll: 348; Family History Film: 1254348; Page: 433B; Enumeration District: 336; Image: 0450. Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. 1880 U.S. Census Index provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints © Copyright 1999 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. All use is subject to the limited use license and other terms and conditions applicable to this site. Original data: Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.]

Polly died in 1883, probably in Fairview as she is buried in the Norwich Cemetery in Jones County. In his obituary in Boulder Daily Camera of January 28, 1895, David Darling was described as a resident of Valmont, east of Boulder. (The Mrs. G. M. Tomlinson referred to is his daughter Amanda.) We don't know where he was buried.

[Source: Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection (CHNC) online]


There's no reason to believe that David ever followed any other occupation than that of a farmer in his lifetime. He was too young to be a soldier in the War of 1812 and too old to actively participate in the Mexican and Civil Wars. His greatest adventure appears to have been the life changes that took him from a childhood in Rhode Island to his last breath in Colorado 90 years later.

[Ancestry.com]



*You can read my posts about David Darling Sr. who was a veteran of the Revolutionary War here and here.

© 2017 Copyright, Christine Manczuk, All Rights Reserved.